A survey of international suppliers for package printing in Asia - Part 2

Is the packaging industry’s future Asian?

With a glimpse towards the future, Flexo & Gravure Global asked a ­variety of suppliers to the package printing industries for their thoughts and strategies around the expanding Asian markets. Collectively, each respondent emphasized that their growth strategies revolve around and often hinge upon successfully navigating the changing economics and demographics involved in Asia’s financial expansion.

By Michael Buchsbaum

 

Corinne Schmid, Director global marketing, ebeam Technologies

1) How would you describe the importance and value of the growing Asian package printing markets to your firm?

The Asian package printing market is very important to ebeam Technologies. We have a sales and marketing presence in China, ­Japan and South Korea. Our Ateliers line in Yokahama and Shangai are part of our Access ebeam program and provide a team of experts and an EBLab in a workshop environment. In these Ateliers, innovators in the field of printing can explore new possibilities and learn about ebeam curing and how it can help meet and exceed the demands of this vast and rapidly growing market.

 

2) What are the challenges that western firms face when trying to enter those markets? Can you broadly describe your company’s entry strategy?

In China the curing industry has traditionally been characterized by high energy consumption and emmissions, inferior quality and low efficiency. Electron beam curing delivers a clean, low energy, virtually instantaneous and sustainable solution that results in higher gloss vibrant finishes on any colour with greater scratch resistance. But ebeam curing is still very new and the Asian market needs educating about its production benefits. Hence our Access ebeam program and seminar series both of which are proving very successful as part of our strategy to enter the Asian market.

 

3) What are the factors that you feel will affect the growth of the packaging and printing industries and markets in Asia over the next five to ten years? And how are you tailoring your product lines to fit the needs and demands of the region?

Our ebeam seminars are open to all package printers in Asia who are interested in learning about the business benefits of ­electron beaming technology, ­including how it can improve quality, speed-up processes and throughput and help acheive sustainability goals.

The seminars focus on digital printing, the crosslinking of polymers, sterilization of food packaging, and food security. All feature industry experts as guest speakers and a networking lunch.

 

Rudi Weis-Schiff, Director of business development, Janoschka

1) How would you describe the importance and value of the growing Asian package printing markets to your firm?

The biggest growth in flexible packaging markets in the ­coming years will be in Asia. Therefore it is essential for Janoschka to establish a strong presence in that region, not only to help local players and newcomers to develop in that market, but also to assist international converters and accompany global brand owners to implement their business strategy in that region.

 

2) What are the challenges that western firms face when trying to enter those markets? Can you broadly describe your company’s entry strategy?

There is no fixed entry strategy as each Asian country is very different in terms of culture, politics, laws and business behaviour. Asia is also a very price sensitive market and you have to know and adapt to local market conditions if you want to succeed. Janoschka’s preference is to team up with local partners and form joint ventures so that all parties add their full expertise to create a successful outcome.

 

3) What are the factors that you feel will affect the growth of the packaging and printing industries and markets in Asia over the next five to ten years? And how are you tailoring your product lines to fit the needs and demands of the region?

In addition to growing populations, which means more consumers, consumer behaviours will also change. More and more products will and must be packed. Packaging contains and protects. Packaging is also an image carrier and an excellent method to communicate directly with the consumer.

Asians are also often interested in new tastes and new products. They generally consume in smaller quantities, which means more single and smaller packs.

Things are also moving faster in Asia, therefore I expect that packaging cycles will also be shorter. This means more frequent design changes and, as a consequence, more printing tools will be needed.

 

 

 

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